2022 Matric Exams Are Approved by Umalusi

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Umalusi Approves 2022 Matric Exams,2022 Matric Exams Are Approved by Umalusi

2022 Matric Exams Are Approved by Umalusi

As the current school year nears its end, the quality assurance organization uMalusi has formally validated the country’s readiness to begin this year’s final exams.

According to the Council for Quality Assurance in General and Further Education and Training, Umalusi, final exams for 2022 can now be written.

It has finished its mission of observing and validating the schooling sector’s readiness to conduct national examinations in 2022.

Umalusi indicated that marking will be done at 186 different locations by 53 926 different markers. The IEB has 13 875 (12 857 in 2021) candidates who will take the exams at 232 full-time test centers and six part-time examination centers. This includes 15 new IEB schools.

The number of DBE candidates increased from 897 786 in 2021 to 923 460 in 2022. Candidates will take the examinations at 6 885 testing centers across the country. According to Dr. Mafu Rakometsi, CEO of Umalusi, the identified issues are not serious enough to jeopardize the validity of the tests.

“Similar to the challenges brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic in the past, the education sector, like other sectors, continues to experience challenges related to load shedding. “

He further noted that Umalusi appreciates all assessment organizations’ efforts in putting measures in place to ensure the integrity of the 2022 national tests.

Umalusi also asked assessment organizations to make alternative arrangements for the provision of electricity during exam administration to limit the possibility of load shedding. Rakometsi firmly advised everyone involved in the exam not to cheat.

Umalusi also suggested that the testing organizations develop backup plans for power supply during the exam writing process.

 

Official Statement

 

For immediate release: 14 October 2022
Umalusi approves the writing of the 2022 end of the year examinations
Umalusi, the Council for Quality Assurance in General and Further Education and
Training, has completed its role of monitoring and verifying the readiness of the
public and private assessment bodies to manage and conduct the 2022 end of
the year national examinations. The assessment bodies are the – Department of
Basic Education (DBE), Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET),
Independent Examinations Board (IEB), and South African Comprehensive
Assessment Institute (SACAI).
As part of its quality assurance mandate, Umalusi is required to assess the levels of
readiness of the public and private assessment bodies to conduct, administer and
manage the examinations prior to the commencement of such examinations. In
doing so, Umalusi uses a framework that focuses on the following areas: (a)
management of examinations, (b) registration of candidates, (c) registration of
examination centres, (d) moderation of school-based assessment (SBA), (e)
printing, packaging and distribution of question papers, (f) conduct of
examinations, (g) selection and appointment of marking personnel, (h)
standardisation of marking guidelines, (i) audit of marking centres, (j) audit of the
systems for mark capturing, and (k) development of systems for the management
of examination irregularities. Based on the findings, Umalusi provides a
comprehensive report to each assessment body and members of the South
African public regarding the readiness of the assessment body to manage,
administer and conduct the national examinations. The focus of this statement is
only on the processes which have been concluded to date.
In connection with candidature, all assessment bodies have successfully
completed registration of candidates and the national registration outlook is as
follows at the time of the release of this statement:
Candidate Enrolled for the National Senior Certificate (NSC)
Assessment Body Full-Time Part-Time Total
DBE 755 981 167 479 923 460
IEB 12 599 968 13 567
SACAI – 4 951 4 951
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The DBE’s candidature has increased to 923 460 in 2022 from 897 786 in 2021. The
candidates will sit the examinations at 6 885 examinations centres across the
country. Marking will be conducted at 186 (193 in 2021) marking centres by 53 926
(41 596 in 2021) markers.
The IEB has 13 875 (12 857 in 2021) candidates who will write the examinations at
232 examination centres for full-time candidates and six (6) centres for part-time
candidates. These numbers include 15 new IEB schools.
The SACAI, which will for the first time be managing and conducting the
examinations as a fully accredited assessment body after Umalusi granted it
accreditation to assess the NSC and the General Education and Training
Certificate: Adult Education and Training (GETC: ABET) with effect from 1 October
2022, has registered 4 951 part-time NSC candidates (a steady increase from 4 361
in 2021). The examinations will be written at 85 examination centres (compared to
72 centres in 2021).
Overall, approximately 942 000 candidates distributed across the three assessment
bodies are registered to write the NSC in 2022.
With regard to the qualifications assessed by the Department of Higher Education
and Training (DHET), the National Certificate Vocational (NCV) examinations will
start on 24 October and conclude on 28 November while the NATED (N2 – N3)
ones are scheduled to take place between 14 and 30 November 2022.
The application of the Umalusi criteria, outlined at the begging of this statement,
to assess the readiness of the public and private assessment bodies to manage
and conduct the 2022 end of the year national examinations has yielded differing
results for each of the assessment bodies. The results are summarised below per
assessment body.

 

Other Articles

Department of Basic Education
• The inadequate staffing at both the National and District Offices in key
Examinations and Assessment Chief Directorates. In 2021, a directive was issued
in this regard and no significant improvement has been observed to date.
• The continued non-compliance with the criterion on the storage and nodal
points. This continues to be observed in the Free State, Limpopo, North-West
and Western Cape provinces. With reference to Limpopo, whereas Umalusi
issued the directives on the same risk in 2021 no significant improvement has
been noticed.
• The non-functionality of the District Assessment Integrity Committee (DAIC) and
the School Assessment Integrity Committee (SAIC) to address irregularities at
these two levels has the potential to compromise the management of
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irregularities associated with internal assessment and the reporting thereof. This
finding is made with reference to the Free State, Gauteng, Limpopo,
Mpumalanga and North-West provinces.
• The disruptions caused by load shedding and the lack of sustainable back-up
systems at examination centres during the writing of the examinations,
especially in connection with subjects with a practical component, namely
Computer Applications Technology (CAT), Information Technology (IT), and
South African Sign Language Home Language (SASL HL).
• The over 500 candidates who are based at Lebombo in Eswatini and registered
to write the NSC examinations under the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Education
Department.
Department of Higher Education and Training
• The unavailability of a system for the management and approval of
accommodations something which leads to examination centres granting
accommodations to candidates without the approval of the DHET.
• The unavailability of the list of reserve markers for the replacement of markers
who may be unavailable during marking due to unforeseen circumstances.
• There are some private colleges that continue to be implicated in irregularities.
• The inadequate monitoring of high-risk examination centres.
Based on the foregoing, these assessment bodies have been directed to provide
Umalusi with reports detailed reports to explain how they plan to mitigate the risks
identified.
Independent Examinations Board (IEB) and South African Comprehensive
Assessment Institute (SACAI)
Based on the audit conducted on the reports and the evaluation of the supporting
evidence submitted independently by the IEB and SACAI, Umalusi is satisfied that
each of these assessment bodies is ready to conduct, administer and manage
the November 2022 NSC examinations.
After conducting a thorough assessment of the readiness of the basic education
system and the post school education and training (PSET) system to manage and
conduct the 2022 national examinations, Umalusi is generally satisfied that all
assessment bodies are ready to undertake this massive task. Umalusi has therefore
granted approval to the public and private assessment bodies to manage and
conduct the 2022 end of the year national examinations in respect of the:
• National Senior Certificate (NSC) – assessed by the Department of Basic
Education (DBE); the Independent Examinations Board (IEB), and the South
African Comprehensive Assessment Institute (SACAI);
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• National Certificate Vocational (NCV: L2 – L4) – assessed by the Department of
Higher Education and Training (DHET);
• NATED Report 190/191 (N2 – N3) – assessed by the DHET.
The identified shortcomings are not of such a magnitude that they have the
potential to put the credibility of the examinations at risk. Umalusi appreciates the
effort made by all assessment bodies in putting systems in place to ensure that the
integrity of the 2022 national examinations is not compromised.
Similar to the challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic in the past, the
education sector, like the other sectors of society, continue to experience
challenges related to load shedding. Umalusi calls upon the assessment bodies to
make alternative arrangements for the supply of power during the writing of the
examinations to mitigate the risk of load-shedding.
Regarding incidents of cheating, the CEO of Umalusi, Dr Mafu Rakometsi, issued a
stern warning to all stakeholders: “Once again, as we have done in the past, we
would like to issue a stern warning to all learners and teachers to refrain from all
forms of cheating, including group copying where teachers are sometimes
implicated. We berate and condemn this criminal practice with the contempt it
deserves. Cheating compromises the integrity of our national examination system,
which we are mandated to jealously protect as a Quality Council.” He went
further to say “We also discourage communities from using national examinations
as leverage for their protest actions. This is unacceptable as it jeopardises the
future of our children. The education of our children is something that each and
every South African should protect jealously.”
Enquiries:
Biki Lepota
Acting Senior Manager: Public Relations and Communications
Biki.Lepota@umalusi.org.za
Cell number: 076 920 6184

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